Tuesday, 20 April 2010

Making Adjustments


I knew it would be different; not running a pub. I was warned that a "mourning" period would be something more powerful than I'd expect. But not me of course, I'm a tough person me - I'd be happy to be free of the intolerable imposition on my freedom; the inability to have any sort of life that didn't breathe "pub, pub, pub, don't forget about the pub" as a tiresome whisper of guilt in my shell like if I dared to step away for a few hours.

And here I am, just over a month after we sold the millstone that was our home, our lively hood and our entire existence. We have a nice house in a pleasant neighbourhood with friendly people. Work progresses slowly on improvements to the brewery, marketing, branding and planning for the future. Still, I seem somewhat empty and disjointed, like there is something missing, an important part of my life disrupted to distraction.

I am certain that this is a transitory situation, like my infrequent blog posting. It's certainly not that I am bored, I've got plenty to do, like beer to brew for a start. The lawn is getting to the point of needing to be cut and many of the windows in the house still need curtains, lamps need shades and there are shelves to put up; both at home and at the brewery.

What does this really mean? Am I only born to be a pub Landlord? I don't think so. Despite not feeling quite right, I do, already feel healthier. Eating at normal meal times, for instance, improves one's digestive regularity and consistency in a way that I will refrain from describing.

I have been told by city dwellers that moving to the country takes considerable re-adjustment due to the unnerving silence at night, for instance. More tangible benefits of the rural countryside, like fresh air very often failing to make up for the lack of cultural stimulus and greater retail choice.

It seems I'm suffering from the same readjustment problems. Going from a full on, life engulfing situation to one where I have more choice about the hour by hour activities is causing disconcerting side effects that are hard to describe. Couple this with the fact that we are still living out of boxes and there is no real comfortable place for me to sit down and write. Perhaps this is the biggest problem; I miss writing and I need a desk.

7 comments:

Cooking Lager said...

Good to see your well, fella. Takes a while to settle.

Ed said...

Where's your new brewery and have you decided on a name yet?

Eddie86 said...

It'll come. Moving from Nottingham the first thing I noticed I missed was the police sirens every night. I can't imagine not thinking about the pub every minute though...

Kristy said...

It takes a while - when I first stopped running pubs I didn't know what to do with myself - running a pub takes up your whole life so suddenly you have time on your hands.

Couple of nice sunny bank holiday weekends when for the first time you can just relax and enjoy it and you'll soon appreciate the difference!!

Fill your time with writing - we miss it

Mark, Real-Ale-Reviews.com said...

@Eddie86 The squeeze hasn't complained about lack of police sirens since moving from Nottingham to Leeds...

@Dave Get some more beer brewed chap, you'll feel fine. Sounds like you are going through every football fans summer months. It'll be reet soon!

Brewers Union Local 180 said...

The author of this comment is trying to read between the lines.

Darren T said...

I reckon it takes around three months to adjust to any major change in situation... hang on in there, it'll all become a lot more familiar and enjoyable before too long.